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Love and yoga

Love and yoga

Camel Pose – Modification #yogatips

Sirsasana means that the headstand is considered one of the most important yoga poses. Sirsasana is known as "the queen of poses" and the reason is related to the effect it has on the brain and mind. The inversion of this pose leads to increased and unimpeded blood flow to the brain. This leads to more energy for oxygen, nutrients and vitality in the head, to clear thinking and easy concentration.

The increased blood flow of the head stimulates the pituitary gland, which is considered the "master gland", and controls the function of the endocrine system, including the thyroid, adrenals, ovaries and testes. These glands in turn regulate metabolism, growth, blood pressure, sexuality and other basic body functions. An imbalance in the secretion of the various hormones produced by the pituitary gland can lead to many serious disorders of the endocrine system.

Yogically, the increased blood flow of the head helps to awaken the Sahasrara (crown) Chakra (energy center). Sahasrara is considered the most important chakra, which is closely linked to and influences all other chakras and controls the consciousness. When Kundalini Energy unites with the Sahasrara Chakra, the yogi achieves samadhi and becomes enlightened and reunited with the universe and God.

Benefits of Sirsasana

The increased blood flow to the brain stimulates the pituitary gland, which invigorates the mind and the central nervous system. It is believed that the pose has a significant impact on anxiety and other nervous disorders that can lead to other diseases, and is used in the yogic treatment of many disorders.

In the end position, muscles in the neck, shoulders, arms, back and abdomen must be active, which strengthens and invigorates the entire body. Inversion alters the effect of gravity on the body, which has an important effect on the circulation of the legs and the head. Increases the pressure on the diaphragm, which aids in deep exhalation to remove fumes and bacteria from the lungs, and can relate the daily effects of gravity to the spine.

Contraindications

Sirsasana can be done by just about anyone, with a little preparation, including strengthening the shoulders and neck of the arms, as well as some balancing exercises. However, there are contraindications and those who have these conditions should not use Sirsasana.

  • The inversion of Sirsasana increases the pressure of blood flow to the brain and eyes. It is therefore important that Sirsasana is not used for high blood pressure, headaches, bleeding or other brain or blood disorders.
  • Sirsasana should not be treated by people with eye diseases, such as weak eye capillaries, cataracts or conjunctivitis.
  • Sirsasana should not be taken by pregnant or menstruating women.
Perform the pose

When performing the headstand, some steps must be taken before the final pose is attempted. These include strengthening the strength of the neck and shoulders and developing the balance in the inserted position.

  • The preparation steps help build the necessary strength in the neck and shoulders. They should be trained until the force is sufficient to hold the final position. Once the neck strength (and sufficient balance) is achieved, the weight of the body should be worn off the neck. The arms and hands are for support and stability only and are not used to support body weight.
  • Until equilibrium is established, it is recommended to practice Sirsasana next to a wall. In this way, the heels in the final position can be brought into contact with the wall to prevent falling back. The feet should be moved away from the wall to get the right balance for an unsupported headstand. Kneel in front of the wall at a comfortable distance, so that the hands are about 20 cm from the wall when the head is placed in the hands.
  • If you should fall while practicing Sirsasana, bend the body into the fall (forward, backward, or to the side) so that you can land on your feet first. When falling, it is unusual to hurt the body because the height is not large. However, be careful not to collapse the neck, as this may result in injury. Remember to use arm and shoulder strength to support body weight.
  • When learning Sirsasana, it is strongly recommended that you consult with a trained yoga teacher who can help you keep your balance until you have enough experience.
Sirsasana - preparation steps

  1. Kneel on the floor.
  2. Bend over and place your elbows on the mat below and slightly wider than the shoulders. The distance can be measured by moving the arms so that each elbow is held from the inside.
  3. Move your forearms without moving your elbows to lock your fingers. The elbows, forearms and back of the hand should be in contact with the mat.
  4. Lower the head so that the top of the head is in the hands and held securely to prevent movement, and the head crown rests on the mat.
  5. Lower your toes and lift your knees off the ground, with your body weight between your legs and back. Use the arms while learning to support the weight so that the entire body weight is not on the neck.
  6. Move your feet closer to your head, stretch your back and move your buttocks over your head.
  7. From here, the thighs are close to the chest, toes on the mat. Lift one foot from the mat and explore the balance and counterbalance of the movements.
Sirsasana - full pose

  1. Kneel on the floor.
  2. Bend over and place your elbows on the mat below and slightly wider than the shoulders. The distance can be measured by moving the arms so that each elbow is held from the inside.
  3. Move your forearms without moving your elbows to lock your fingers. The elbows, forearms and back of the hand should be in contact with the mat.
  4. Lower the head so that the top of the head is in the hands and held securely to prevent movement, and the head crown rests on the mat.
  5. Lower your toes and lift your knees off the ground, with your body weight between your legs and back. Use the arms while learning to support the weight so that the entire weight does not rest on the neck.
  6. Move your feet closer to your head, stretch your back and move your buttocks over your head.
  7. Slowly bend your knees, control your feet, and bring your thighs close to your chest
  8. Lift both feet together from the mat and adjust the body with small movements to balance the weight of the legs.
  9. Move your feet slowly with your back muscles near your buttocks until your feet are up and your knees are down.
  10. Raise your knees with your legs bent and your feet close to your buttocks until your hips are pointing forward, your thighs are vertical and your knees are aligned with your buttocks.
  11. Slowly stretch your legs and raise your feet above your knees so that the entire body is aligned. This is the final position.
  12. Relax your legs and feet. Keep your back active to support the spine and keep it straight.
  13. Relax the mind and breathe normally.
  14. Leave the pose by slowly reversing the order of steps. Bend your knees and bring your feet close to your buttocks. Bend your hips and lower your knees. Lower your feet and then your knees on the mat.
  15. Relax for 1 minute with the head down in the child's posture to avoid dizziness caused by a change in the blood flow in the brain.